Disabled people don’t have special needs. We have very reasonable human needs. Our needs include freedom from abuse, violence, and mistreatment, the right to autonomy and self-direction, the right to represent ourselves, equal opportunity for education and employment, the right to accommodation, and societal inclusion and acceptance.

The need for accommodation isn’t a “special need”. It’s a basic human right. It’s a leveling of the playing field that allows us the same opportunities and chances as non-disabled people.

Amythest Schaber, http://neurowonderful.tumblr.com/ (via soooyeahanyway)

(via xulaxicana)

huffingtonpost:

This Photo Series That Shows Adorable Kids As Latino Heroes Is Challenging All The Stereotypes

It’s this lack of positive representation for latinos that photographer Eunique Jones Gibson is seeking to address with her project, "Por Ellos, Sí Podemos." Gibson photographed 31 Latino kids ages 2 to 14 for an empowering series that pays tribute both to the trailblazers who broke ground for the community and to the kids who will one day pick up the reins.

(via xulaxicana)

pantyraidpunx:

Happy Indigenous People’s Day! Go pick up a book or watch a documentary and learn about some history and culture you didn’t know before! Observe this day because these things should be common knowledge by now, but colonization doesn’t rhyme with 1492.

pantyraidpunx:

Happy Indigenous People’s Day! Go pick up a book or watch a documentary and learn about some history and culture you didn’t know before! Observe this day because these things should be common knowledge by now, but colonization doesn’t rhyme with 1492.

silensy:

2005-2014

Good lord, this is the most stark portrayal I’ve seen of this.

(Source: always-returning, via hueva-york)

Prison bankers cash in on captive customers

boo-author:

abbyjean:

To get cash to her son, Pat used to purchase a money order at the post office for $1.25 and mail it to the prison, for a total cost of less than $2. But in March of last year, the Virginia Department of Corrections informed her that JPay Inc., a private company in Florida, would begin handling all deposits into inmates’ accounts.

Sending a money order through JPay takes too long, so Taylor started using her debit card to get him funds instead. To send Eddie $50, Taylor must pay $6.95 to JPay. Depending on how much she can afford to send, the fee can be as high as 35 percent. In other states, JPay’s fees approach 45 percent.

After the fee, the state takes out another 15 percent of her money for court fees and a mandatory savings account, which Eddie will receive upon his release in 2021, minus the interest, which goes to the Department of Corrections.

Eddie needs money to pay for basic needs like toothpaste, visits to the doctor and winter clothes. In some states families of inmates pay for toilet paper, electricity, even room and board, as governments increasingly shift the costs of imprisonment from taxpayers to the families of inmates.

“To give him $50, I have to send $70 off my card,” says Taylor, who moved to a smaller apartment on the outskirts of Johnson City in part because of the rising cost of supporting Eddie. “They’re punishing the families, not the inmates.”

I just want to highlight two phrases

as governments increasingly shift the costs of imprisonment from taxpayers to the families of inmates.

and 

a mandatory savings account, which Eddie will receive upon his release in 2021, minus the interest, which goes to the Department of Corrections.

So, the imprisoned are not only expected to bear (through their families) the cost of their own imprisonment, but their money is essentially confiscated and invested for the government’s benefits.

The fact that the banking company is cashing in is only a side effect of the problem of entangling the profit motive with the “justice” system in the first place.

bifishromance:

LA County is considering making homelessness a parole violation and if that isn’t the most fucked up clear proof that the prison system is about getting poor, “unsavory” people out of sight out of mind then I don’t know what is.

There are no words.

(via pomegranatetime)

land-of-propaganda:

SHAWSHOOTING/FERGUSON OCTOBER

Protesters are playing games in the middle of the streets in an act of civil disobedience.

(10/12)

(via jewelismyrealname)

decolonizingmedia:

Decolonize Columbus: Indigenous Peoples’ Day 
Celebrate Something Worth Celebrating. 
Indigenous Peoples’ DayMonday, October 13, 2014Worldwide

decolonizingmedia:

Decolonize Columbus: Indigenous Peoples’ Day 

Celebrate Something Worth Celebrating. 

Indigenous Peoples’ Day
Monday, October 13, 2014
Worldwide

(via lacomeobejas)

queeringfeministreality:

THANK YOU FOR THIS.

queeringfeministreality:

THANK YOU FOR THIS.

(Source: clickthefrog, via blackpaints)

Why do police have quotas? If a doctor went around intentionally sneezing on people to get more patients, that would be seen as a travesty to their profession. But police, can sit around and wait for someone to turn on a red light or commit other mundane ‘offenses’ because they have quotas to meet. Quotas are all the proof we need that policing is not a public service vocation; it’s a business and a subsidiary of Wall Street.
this answer on yahoo from a retired officer will add on some further insight to this (via lamegrownup)

(Source: withoutadjectives, via iridessence)